TenMillionPixels

Kris Regentin | Portland // About // Website // Instagram

#B&W

  1. Troublemaker. Probably making some trouble. 

    Troublemaker. Probably making some trouble. 

    (Source: krza)

  2. Accidental model pose at Shorty’s 

    Accidental model pose at Shorty’s 

    (Source: krza)

  3. kitty
BY ANDRIA

    kitty

    BY ANDRIA

    (Source: krza)

  4. (Source: krza)

  5. Sleeping dog in Mitla, Mexico | Ilford HP5 Plus 400, Pentax K1000, SMC-M 50mm 1.4

    Sleeping dog in Mitla, Mexico | Ilford HP5 Plus 400, Pentax K1000, SMC-M 50mm 1.4

    (Source: krza)

  6. Darren, ninja style | Ilford HP5 Plus 400, Pentax K1000, 50mm 1.4
I love Ilford HP5 Plus. It might be my favorite film (Kodak Portra VC gives HP5 a run for its money in the favorite film department). Faster films get fairly grainy— this is just science, something that must be dealt with. But Ilford knows that engineering a good fast film has nothing to do with eliminating grain; no, instead it has everything to do with controlling grain, making it pleasing. The grain in this shot is very typical of HP5: fairly visible, but smooth and beautiful. No heaviness, no chunkiness, no loss of sharpness. The results are beautiful, full of contrast, and have more dynamic range than can be asked for. The details pop out, and the grain provides a soft and smooth texture. 
On another note, I’m really enjoying seeing my black and white photos in monochromatic hues, with no sepia tone. In the past, all of my B&W prints from Blue Moon have sepia tones because they are printed on color paper. Though sepia tones look fine, I really love the classic monochromatic look much more.

    Darren, ninja style | Ilford HP5 Plus 400, Pentax K1000, 50mm 1.4

    I love Ilford HP5 Plus. It might be my favorite film (Kodak Portra VC gives HP5 a run for its money in the favorite film department). Faster films get fairly grainy— this is just science, something that must be dealt with. But Ilford knows that engineering a good fast film has nothing to do with eliminating grain; no, instead it has everything to do with controlling grain, making it pleasing. The grain in this shot is very typical of HP5: fairly visible, but smooth and beautiful. No heaviness, no chunkiness, no loss of sharpness. The results are beautiful, full of contrast, and have more dynamic range than can be asked for. The details pop out, and the grain provides a soft and smooth texture. 

    On another note, I’m really enjoying seeing my black and white photos in monochromatic hues, with no sepia tone. In the past, all of my B&W prints from Blue Moon have sepia tones because they are printed on color paper. Though sepia tones look fine, I really love the classic monochromatic look much more.

    (Source: krza)

  7. There was no pick!
I’m playing with some faux Ilford film effects. This is Delta 100, which may or may not actually look anything like Delta 100. It’s tough to say— I’m going to compare it to some Delta 100 as soon as my film scanner shows up. One of the things I’ve started to realize in toying with faux film effects in PS is that they almost don’t matter. I mean, would anyone think this is Delta 100 if I said it was? Would it matter whether or not it was Delta 100? 
I think I don’t even know what I’m talking about.
Andria is a nice portrait subject. Ilford Delta 100 Canon 7D, 17-55 IS, fake-ass Ilford Delta effect.

    There was no pick!

    I’m playing with some faux Ilford film effects. This is Delta 100, which may or may not actually look anything like Delta 100. It’s tough to say— I’m going to compare it to some Delta 100 as soon as my film scanner shows up. One of the things I’ve started to realize in toying with faux film effects in PS is that they almost don’t matter. I mean, would anyone think this is Delta 100 if I said it was? Would it matter whether or not it was Delta 100? 

    I think I don’t even know what I’m talking about.

    Andria is a nice portrait subject. Ilford Delta 100 Canon 7D, 17-55 IS, fake-ass Ilford Delta effect.

  8. A boy stands by the burning old Iron Market in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, January 18, 2010. First Prize General News Single, Riccardo Venturi, Italy, Contrasto.
The Boston Globe Big Picture

    A boy stands by the burning old Iron Market in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, January 18, 2010. First Prize General News Single, Riccardo Venturi, Italy, Contrasto.

    The Boston Globe Big Picture

  9. Andria
Pentax K1000, Fuji Neopan
Click through for high-res

    Andria

    Pentax K1000, Fuji Neopan

    Click through for high-res

  10. Boots electric
Pentax K1000, Fuji Neopan 400
Click through for high-res

    Boots electric

    Pentax K1000, Fuji Neopan 400

    Click through for high-res

  11. Lyndsi, at Garabaldi Pier last fall
Fuji Neopan 400, Pentax K1000, SMC-M 50mm f/1.4, printed on color paper. Click for high-res.

    Lyndsi, at Garabaldi Pier last fall

    Fuji Neopan 400, Pentax K1000, SMC-M 50mm f/1.4, printed on color paper. Click for high-res.

  12. Irving Penn print of Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti

Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show the world… Very often what lies behind the façade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.

Last April, I went to the Irving Penn exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery in London while I was there visiting my friend Gabriella. This print was one of Penn’s many silver gelatin portrait prints featured in the exhibit. The entire exhibit moved me, and I must say that I can’t wait until the next time I have an opportunity to see a Penn exhibition. Penn had the privilege of shooting portraits of famous artists like Picasso, Al Pacino, Salvador Dali, Hitchcock, Nicole Kidman, John Updike, Duke Ellington, Ingemar Bergman, Gael García Bernal, Yves Saint Laurent, Grace Kelly, and Truman Capote, amongst many others. But, it is not so much the subject that is what is most important in Penn’s images, but the subject and photographer relationship. 
Penn’s portraits are all black and white, some silver gelatin prints, some platinum prints, that utilized very harsh lighting, and very high detail large format film to provide an extremely intimate and emotional feel. His control of depth of field is very obvious, as many photos are so precisely in focus that it’s hard to fathom how much time he must have spent with a tape measure setting up each shot. His lighting techniques utilized ambient sunlight, as well as artificial tungsten lights, to provide hard shadows that— when combined with his expert compositions— create dramatic feeling and depth in every photo. 
Penn’s compositions are very unique, and a huge aspect of his photos. He used dirty studios, gritty subjects, and discolored foregrounds and backdrops to give his subjects very real feel. Flaws are what make humans human. If you’ve ever seen an airbrushed film or photo, or seen an image that looked too perfect and not real enough, then you understand that it is humankind’s shortcomings and less polished side that makes us so complex and interesting. Penn embraced the depth, quiet, emotion, and and calm of his subjects in order to show who they were, in order to convey them to the viewer with the most dramatic of effect. There are so many of his photos that use a stark, deep gaze from his subject; every time I looked into the eyes of one of them, I felt as if I was sitting face to face with the subject, speaking with them about their life and stories and experiences.
The photographer can be technically perfect (as was Penn in so many cases); and the subject can be beautiful (Audrey Hepburn or Marlene Dietrich), talented (Hitchcock or Stravinsky), or enigmatic (Dali or Jacques Cousteau); but it was the relationship that Penn had with them that allowed the subject to settle into the atmosphere and bear their soul through a moment of frozen time, filled with emotion and feeling. Every single line, every single crease, every single part of that person’s being manifested in their skin, hair, expression, and pose, was captured by Penn’s lens.
If the opportunity ever comes up for you to go see a Penn exhibit, do not hesitate to spend the better part of the day appreciating his work.

    Irving Penn print of Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti

    Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show the world… Very often what lies behind the façade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.

    Last April, I went to the Irving Penn exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery in London while I was there visiting my friend Gabriella. This print was one of Penn’s many silver gelatin portrait prints featured in the exhibit. The entire exhibit moved me, and I must say that I can’t wait until the next time I have an opportunity to see a Penn exhibition. Penn had the privilege of shooting portraits of famous artists like Picasso, Al Pacino, Salvador Dali, Hitchcock, Nicole Kidman, John Updike, Duke Ellington, Ingemar Bergman, Gael García Bernal, Yves Saint Laurent, Grace Kelly, and Truman Capote, amongst many others. But, it is not so much the subject that is what is most important in Penn’s images, but the subject and photographer relationship. 

    Penn’s portraits are all black and white, some silver gelatin prints, some platinum prints, that utilized very harsh lighting, and very high detail large format film to provide an extremely intimate and emotional feel. His control of depth of field is very obvious, as many photos are so precisely in focus that it’s hard to fathom how much time he must have spent with a tape measure setting up each shot. His lighting techniques utilized ambient sunlight, as well as artificial tungsten lights, to provide hard shadows that— when combined with his expert compositions— create dramatic feeling and depth in every photo. 

    Penn’s compositions are very unique, and a huge aspect of his photos. He used dirty studios, gritty subjects, and discolored foregrounds and backdrops to give his subjects very real feel. Flaws are what make humans human. If you’ve ever seen an airbrushed film or photo, or seen an image that looked too perfect and not real enough, then you understand that it is humankind’s shortcomings and less polished side that makes us so complex and interesting. Penn embraced the depth, quiet, emotion, and and calm of his subjects in order to show who they were, in order to convey them to the viewer with the most dramatic of effect. There are so many of his photos that use a stark, deep gaze from his subject; every time I looked into the eyes of one of them, I felt as if I was sitting face to face with the subject, speaking with them about their life and stories and experiences.

    The photographer can be technically perfect (as was Penn in so many cases); and the subject can be beautiful (Audrey Hepburn or Marlene Dietrich), talented (Hitchcock or Stravinsky), or enigmatic (Dali or Jacques Cousteau); but it was the relationship that Penn had with them that allowed the subject to settle into the atmosphere and bear their soul through a moment of frozen time, filled with emotion and feeling. Every single line, every single crease, every single part of that person’s being manifested in their skin, hair, expression, and pose, was captured by Penn’s lens.

    If the opportunity ever comes up for you to go see a Penn exhibit, do not hesitate to spend the better part of the day appreciating his work.

  13. Darren applies a quick Gorilla Tape patch to a dinged surfboard prior to a session at Shorties. 
Pentax K1000, SMC-M 50mm f/1.4, Ilford HP5 400, color paper. Click through for high-res. 

    Darren applies a quick Gorilla Tape patch to a dinged surfboard prior to a session at Shorties. 

    Pentax K1000, SMC-M 50mm f/1.4, Ilford HP5 400, color paper. Click through for high-res.